number 930
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week 18
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RAFAL KOLACKI - NINKYO DANTAI (CD by Zoharum) *
RE-DRUM/B*TONG (split CD by Zoharum)
SOAR TRIO – EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT HEIST (CD by Edgetone)
JASON VAN GULICK – ENTELECHY (CD by Idiosyncratics Records)
KATE SOPER  & WET INK ENSEMBLE – VOICES FROM THE KILLING JAR (CD by Carrier)
CHIHEI HATAKEYAMA & HAKOBUNE - IT IS, ISN'T IT (CD by White Paddy Mountain) *
BOGAN GHOST - ZERFALL (CD by Relative Pitch) *
SNOQUALMIE FALLS - DREAM SEQUENCE (CDR by Twice Removed) *
ZENJUNGLE - LEAVING STATIONS (CDR by Twice Removed) *
PRINZIP NEMESIS - MY NAME IS ASSUMPTION (CDR by Attenuation Circuit) *
DEREK PIOTR & MIKAH MEYER - WEATHER PATTERNS (CDR by Silent Media) *
TIMMY LOK – VOLTAGE CONTROLLED FUN (3” CDR by Lona Records)
AUTOMATING - BEREITSCHAFTSPOTENTIAL (3"CDR by Ice Age Productions) *
COOPER BOWMAN – NO P.A. (cassette by Mazurka Editions)
MARTIN HANNETT - PLEASURES OF THE UNKNOWN (DVD/Book - sold separatly by OzIt Records)




RAFAL KOLACKI - NINKYO DANTAI (CD by Zoharum)
RE-DRUM/B*TONG (split CD by Zoharum)
Poland's Hati one half is Rafal Kolacki and unlike his partner he is less active in releasing solo material. 'Ninkyo Dantai' is his second solo album, following 'Panoptikon' (see Vital Weekly 896). What he shares with the other half of Hati, Rafal Iwanski, is his love for electronic and electric sounds, unlike in their band, which is all about percussion and analogue drums. Maybe because if you only have two hands to operate the music machines it's easier to have them all electronic. I'd say electric as Kolacki uses sound recordings from motor devices as a starting point for his pieces. These sounds go into the computer for further processing. There is also an amount of found sound here, such as flight control talk. This all has to do with Kolacki's "ideological manifesto whose main idea is the thesis that technology is assuming control over contemporary civilisation and culture, including music, the consequences of which are numerous natural and industrial disasters (especially the nuclear ones). Trivial, but true". I am not sure what is trivial about it (or perhaps true), and it all may seem a bit grim to me, but maybe this is now I know all of this. The moody electronic music is indeed dark, but darker than what is usual in this field? I guess not. This is fine dark, atmospheric drone music and very occasionally,  such as in 'At' (if that is the title, not easy to read), it seems that Kolacki takes in some of the processed sounds from Hati, but for all I know I might be wrong. The final piece is like a coda to the world's end, slow and meditative. If you like Maurizio Bianchi's more apocalyptic works then I am sure you like this too. A very refined work of the stuff that makes nightmares.
As much as I don't like compilations, I sure like a split CD or one that has three artists: it leaves us with a lot of time to explore one musician. Here for instance, Re-Drum, being Pavel Aleshin from Russia, whose previous release 'Eclipse' was reviewed in Vital Weekly 875 and B*Tong being Chris Sigdell, of whom we have reviewed countless releases by now. Each of these projects has three pieces here (and perhaps a split on vinyl is even better; it makes it a real split, and your mind knows you are listening to something when turning the record over) and they both have some thirty minutes at their disposal. Re-Drum continues his ambient explorations of sampled acoustic instruments and likewise sampled field recordings. All stretched out, all with more sound effects to create that endless sustaining, extended field of ambient music. Like before, it's not demanding music, yet at the same time also not disposable; the perfect ambient music in the book of Brian Eno, I'd say. B*Tong is more drone than ambient, and I know I am putting on a play of semantics here. B*Tong's music is more experimental than Re-Drum here, more cut-up, collage like, feeding his sound sources of an unknown origin through all sorts of laptop plug ins and creating three electro-acoustic collage pieces out of that. It's also dark, it's also moody, but it's more cut-up. Sounds fly in, stay there for a while, and move out. Sound-wise it stays in rather one particular mid-range section it seems to me, and it seems to lack a bit of dynamics here and there. Maybe that's a decision he took for these three pieces but I thought the music could have a bit more impact. But it's surely nice enough and together with the three Re-Drum makes up a nice album altogether. (FdW)
Address: http://www.zoharum.com

SOAR TRIO – EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT HEIST (CD by Edgetone)
Soar Trio combines the talents of Skeeter C.R.Shelton (sax), Joel Peterson (bass) and Thollem McDonas (piano).  Peterson is a Detroit-based multi-instrumentalist who played with many improvisers in many different combinations. Shelton is also from Detroit, worked with James Blood Ulmer, Fred Anderson and is a central figure in Detroit improve scene. McDonas is not so much a geographically based musician. He is constantly on tour and recording with many different musicians. McDonas studied piano from very early on. But switched to direct political action for a period of 20 years. Gradually music was integrated in his political action. And since about ten years McDonas is a fulltime musician and improviser taking inspiration from his political attitude to the world. His output on cds is considerable, but I guess being on stage is the real thing for him. One of his many collaborations is the Soar Trio. Their music clearly is a form of free improvised music, framed from jazz and also from modern classical vocabulary.  The expressive improvisations came about from fine interplay between very experienced improvisers who have a rich vocabulary and a clear voice to their disposal. Warm, communicative, but also demanding music. No drums or percussion but music with a strong drive and nucleus. Everything can become a convention. Even free jazz and improvised music.  However improvised music should – by definition - be open for the new. Of course this is limited by the imagination and vocabulary by the players. In the company of these three players one feels they try to bring improvisation a step further in their engaging research. (DM)
Address: http://www.edgetonerecords.com

JASON VAN GULICK – ENTELECHY (CD by Idiosyncratics Records)
Where will the Big Bang start? Will it be done by the Japanese drummers or by the Irish Marching Parades? I really don't know, but I have heard a big bang created by Jason van Gulick. He was playing at the Ceremony of Ascension festival in Antwerp last year. He had set up his percussion set in a former house-room in the artist residency AIR. He builds a quiet atmosphere with a subtle use of several bowls on the drums. The resonating sounds fill the room completely. Jason van Gulick explores his percussion instruments intense and searches for the limits of the possibilities of his set and the room where he is playing in. He combines this with the minimal but very effective use of some electronics. The CD “Entelechy” reaches the same intensity as this performance. Six tracks illustrate how Jason van Gulick is working. The atmosphere is quiet, harsh, noisy, repetitive, subtle, repeatable and variable. He reaches several sound frequencies and sometimes his compositions are abstract and other have some references to common musical styles like jazz. Jason van Gulick is a French musician who is working and living in Belgium. His musical background is in the hard core metal scene and post rock. For know he is interested and involved into experimental music and electro-acoustic music. He plays solo and in collaborations like Y.E.R.M.O. a electro-acoustic noise project with guitarist Xavier Dubois sound-artist Yannick Franck who is also running the label Idiosyncratics Records. The album Entelechy is almost 30 minutes, but is full of beautiful sounds, rhythms and atmospheres and clear statement how you can use percussion in a creative way. (JKH)
Address: http://idiosyncraticslabel.blogspot.be/

KATE SOPER  & WET INK ENSEMBLE – VOICES FROM THE KILLING JAR (CD by Carrier)
From the first moments listening to this cd I felt pulled into this exciting work of Kate Soper. Soper is a composer and performer whose work “explores the integration of drama and rhetoric into musical structure”.  Also she is co-director and vocalist for the Wet Ink Ensemble, a New York-based ensemble of performers and composers, focused on innovative composed music.  It this ensemble that performs her work ‘Voices from the Kiling Jar’, written between 2010 and 2012.  We hear  Erin Lesser (flutes), Joshua Modney (violin, trumpet), Ian Antonio (percussion, spoken voice), Alex Mincek (clarinet, saxophone), Eric Wubbels (piano, reocrder), Sam Pluta (live electronics, vocals) and Kate Soper (vocals, clarinet and piano).  A killing jar is a tool used for killing butterflies and other insects without damaging their bodies. This is used by Soper as a metaphor for the difficult and dangerous situations seven historical women were exposed to.  Each of the seven pieces that make up ‘Voices from the Killing Jar’ is dedicated to one of these women. For a better understanding of this project, I quote Soper here:  “There is one final issue I would like to address in this paper: the issue of gender, as it relates to both the subject matter of the piece and to my experiences as a female composer and soprano. While Voices from the Killing Jar may certainly be understood and appreciated without particular attention to either its possible relevance to feminist theory or to the gender of its composer, the conception and realization of this piece have more to do with issues of gender identity than any previous work of mine, and these issues must be explored for a complete understanding of the work. The women featured in Voices from the Killing Jar are in various situations of mortal, psychological, or spiritual danger that make a kind of Venn diagram of female entrapment: enduring marriage to an unworthy (or worse) husband, as are Clytemnestra, Isabel, Madame Bovary, and Daisy; suffocating from the infuriating uselessness of being an adolescent girl, as do May Kasahara, Lucile, and Isabel; or immobilized in a powerless position that prevents them from acting in self-defense, as are Isabel, Lucile, and Lady Macduff. “ The music combines acoustic and electronic sources. The players make use of extended techniques.  Their wide range of possibilities is however restricted in well-defined arrangements and textures. Resulting in a beautiful and convincing album. A strong statement by Soper! (DM)
Address: http://www.carrierrecords.com

CHIHEI HATAKEYAMA & HAKOBUNE - IT IS, ISN'T IT (CD by White Paddy Mountain)
This morning I received two things in the mail: this CD and the long awaited book on Muslimgauze. I began playing the music on this CD as I started to read the book, and by the time the music was finished, the book wasn't done, obviously, so I decided to stick the CD on repeat. Partly because this music fits so well while doing something like reading. It's ambient music, it's something that doesn't hold much new insights on the genre, but does exactly what ambient music should be doing. Provide a surrounding. Here we have two Japanese guitarists, who recorded this album on January 3rd of this year, and the three pieces (around twenty-five minutes each) are mostly unedited and appear here as they were recorded. Hatakeyama plays a Juno 2 synthesizer and electric guitar and Hakobune also plays electric guitar, but nothing else. A simply strum to start with, which are then expanding in these major glacial drone pieces, with minimalist changes somewhere lingering about. Changes of the kind that could as easily go by unnoticed. Music that is undemanding and nice; elegantly played by two men who know what they are doing. Music of the kind that holds no innovation, no new insight on the idioms of ambient music, but it's all very nice. Back to the book, CD again on repeat. (FdW)
Address: http:///whitepaddymountain.tumblr.com

BOGAN GHOST - ZERFALL (CD by Relative Pitch)
A nine track CD of trumpet and cello improvisations by two women of international standing in the very field of improvised music. Seven of these pieces were recorded in Berlin and two seem to be some of some sort of long distance collaborations. On the first of these, also the opening piece of the CD, Liz Allbee plays synthesizer rather than trumpet, whereas Anthea Caddy plays cello on all nine pieces. I am not sure, but I think by choosing a band name they probably intend this to be not a one-off collaboration. These nine pieces are not long, in total only thirty-five minutes, but within those thirty-five minutes a lot happens. From the plainer, regular strumming on the cello and the wind down the tube, it bounces back and forth between low and high-end dynamics of both instruments and between the soft/loud axes. Never of course really noise like but with a gritty undercurrent, such as in 'Trenches'. Never really all quiet, but sparse and intense. These pieces are rather short and the point, which I actually quite enjoyed. It seemed to have stripped away all things unnecessary, but left behind what is really needed. My favourite piece is 'Accumulation' which is indeed an accumulation of their instruments, almost more than one of each it seems, and making a fine drone like piece; but actually, perhaps I had no particular preference here; it all sounded like an exciting disc of improvisations to me. (FdW)
Address: http://www.relativepitchrecords.com

SNOQUALMIE FALLS - DREAM SEQUENCE (CDR by Twice Removed)
ZENJUNGLE - LEAVING STATIONS (CDR by Twice Removed)
From down under we have here two new releases by Twice Removed, and the first one is a long distance release betweeen Jeff Stonehouse from West Sussex in the UK and Alicia Merz from 'the Waikato lowlands surrounding Hamilton, New Zealand'. Two years ago they discovered each other’s work and decided to look if it would fit together, and then released an EP. This is the first album and has one hour-long piece of music. Stonehouse (who incidently also works as Listening Mirror and has had releases on Hibernate, Cooper Cult, Twice Removed and Dronarivm) plays guitar and Merz (who works as Birds Of Passage with three albums on Denovali, and worked with the Dale Cooper Quartet and Aidan Baker) uses her voice. It's a monolithic piece and after a five minute fade in it stays on the same level for quite some time. Voices are hard to discover in here, but maybe they are all heavily pulled under in the world of sound effects? Maybe we could say something similar of the guitar sounds. Only towards the end, say the final nine minutes, guitar is to be recognized and the voices are more like choir of humming buddhist monks. It's all stretched out in one long flow of sounds. Not exactly the soundtrack for this mild sun infested spring day, but more autumn/leaves fall sort of thing, in a dark, grey, misty forest in the twilight time of the day. I was reminded of Windy & Carl: the more ambient phase of the post rock. I thought Snoqualmie Falls did a more than fine piece of music here. Perhaps not really something new, but maybe the psychedelic post/rock/ambient is due a revival anyway.
From Athens, Greece, hails Phil Gardelis, who works as Zenjungle, playing tenor and soprano saxophone, electric guitar, keyboards and percussion, along with his own field recordings. He has had releases on Catalogue Of Wonders, Flaming Pines and worked with John Daly, Benjamin Pereira and others. He doesn't use many samples from outside sources or synthesizers. Yet somehow the three pieces he has on this limited release (50 copies) have a drone like character. Field recordings and processing there of seems to provide these three pieces with a backbone. On top of that he waves a fine pattern together from sustaining guitar melodies, locked and looped in one of thos fashionable devices of a one-man band. Then, isolated, remotely humming might be a saxophone, which adds a nice smokey, nightclub atmosphere to the proceedings. It has a film noir like atmosphere. Desolated view, street at night, black and white, and the humming of a ventilator. Now, perhaps I am not the most jazz like finger snapper around, but in a way I was reminded of that old A-Tent record on Cherry Red (less any piano) in that similar gloomy atmosphere.  Maybe 'Leaving Stations' was a bit long at twenty-four minutes, but the other two at just below or less than ten minutes have the right length for such excursions. But throughout I found myself enjoying this a lot. Maybe I like (drone-) jazz? (FdW)
Address: http://www.twiceremoved.storenvy.com

PRINZIP NEMESIS - MY NAME IS ASSUMPTION (CDR by Attenuation Circuit)
If I tell you that this release deals with sounds recorded traveling through India, you may form already an idea what this will be about. Right? Human interaction, sounds from nature and that's it? That's not the case here, or perhaps only partly. Prinzip Nemesis, of whom I think I didn't hear before, takes these field recordings from India and brings into the context of 'music', by adding guitars, pianos and synthesizers. Not a collage of sounds from an exotic country but pieces that stand by themselves, in which a voice (by Birgit Merk, one half of Prinzip Nemesis) sings, recites and whispers additional lyrics, along with looped voice material. She and her partner Marc Fischer add more or less a pop tune to the field recordings. This is not y'r usual field recording turned music (say in the classical, Luc Ferrari sense), but lushly played and with a fine sense of naivety. I am not sure if it works well in every track, as I seemed to like the more adventurous pieces, such as 'Namaste' best: here we have a collage of fire recordings, a bit of piano and synthesizer and the looped greeting that makes up the title. Not altogether, but spread out over the course of ten minutes. Sometimes I don't seem to get along with it, such as the guitars and singing in 'Mumbai'. It's a most curious release; a daring experiment that works and sometimes it doesn't, which makes it a successful release in my book. (FdW)
Address: http://www.attenuationcircuit.de

DEREK PIOTR & MIKAH MEYER - WEATHER PATTERNS (CDR by Silent Media)
Silent Media is a label that cares about packaging. Here we have a 'lasercut chipboard box' with cards on fine stock and CDR. It's the collaboration between Meire Tadao, who is responsible for the photography on this release, Mikah Meyer and Derek Piotr. The latter we know from his earlier releases (see Vital Weekly 828, 799 and 871) as someone who loves computers to process sounds, and also with a fine dedication to using his voice as an instrument. Meyer is a tenor and met up with Piotr in 2011. They did some recordings in St. Peter's Cathedral in Danbury, Connecticut (where Piotr also recorded bits of his previous release, 'Raj') of Meyer singing Piotr poems, which, along with the church organ, were then processed on the computer. Meyer's singing sounds at times like Wim Mertens and at other times as a bunch of Gregorian monks down at the monastery and recorded through a long tune from the high middle ages until now. Quite voice heavy this release, and the voice as such is always recognizable. Piotr keeps his processing down to a minimum, but puts in those spots where it is needed. It's all less beat oriented than the previous and more about textured sounds and monk chanting. Occasionally there is a click, a cut or some hiss, as Piotr doesn't hide his previous interests. I said the previous was a major leap forward, and I'd like to say that about this one too. It's not another leap forward compared to the previous release; this is a further exploration into what Piotr does and as such another major leap in exploring more roads. (FdW)
Address: http://silentmediaprojects.com

TIMMY LOK – VOLTAGE CONTROLLED FUN (3” CDR by Lona Records)
Hong Kong's Timmy Lok achieves his distinctive spin on techno by erecting a backbone of live drumming and dribbling layers of analog synths and theremin over top. On this mini-CDR, two ten-minute contraptions are allowed to progress in curious trajectories. The title-track's wonky structure is a good example, as garbled acieed synths are slung over a rhythmic throb before the bottom drops out and things seem to spiral in several directions at once. It is this excitable whimsy that most distinguishes the tracks, leading them far astray from techno tropes. Instead Lok's approach wields an innate childishness, guided by its own impulsiveness towards novel and energizing sounds as opposed to those, which generically follow from one another. Track two, “Come Back and Tweak,” is further evidence of this juvenile jubilation – it's as though a five-year old has gotten hold of a 303, sending amorphous squiggles of sound from left channel to right with goofy vigour. Meanwhile, the supposedly organic percussion brings a full-bodied feel to the rhythm section, though the absence of conventional bass deflates some of the oomph. This is more likely to intrigue the enterprising avant-listener than any hardened techno-heads; nevertheless, it is a titillating adventure into the acid's scene remote fringe. (MT)
Address: http://www.lona-records.com/

AUTOMATING - BEREITSCHAFTSPOTENTIAL (3"CDR by Ice Age Productions)
Sasha Margolis hails from Melbourne, Australia and offers here a highly limited 3"CDR (edition of 25 copies) of 'studio created binaural soundscapes and archaic tape based drones. Field recordings, found sound, tape manipulation, noise and effects units', which perhaps sums it all up, already. We reviewed some previous works (Vital Weekly 841, 843 and 862) and I still have not much more information than just this, so let's go straight the music, which lasts exactly twenty-one minutes, and goes from noise 'n rhythm to drone to medium sized noise walls. And one point the sound goes down a bit, and overall this quite a diverse piece of music, moving in a dynamic way from medium low to a harsh ending. It has perhaps something that one could identify as 'retro sounding': the (perhaps) low resolution samples of the casio SK-5 maybe, topped with some fine sound effects and somewhere in the end stages of the piece a meandering desolated melody. This piece is made with some great care and consideration. Someone who knows what works and what not. I wouldn't have minded some more music by Automating, whose previous releases already gave me much pleasure. (FdW)
Address: http://iceageproductions.bandcamp.com

COOPER BOWMAN – NO P.A. (cassette by Mazurka Editions)
Every few months or so I sing the praises of Jarrod Skene's Mazurka Editions label, and it typically boils down to my appreciation of the imprint's ethos. Like their cryptic, monochrome packaging, these tapes capture just-out-of-focus sounds that advance essence over detail. Cooper Bowman's 'No P.A.' tape is no exception. This is a recording Bowman did for Radio Valerie, a Melbourne-based station. Amidst its muddle, we encounter glimpses of familiar sounds – the reverberant, blurred chatter and clatter of anonymous someones at an airport, glimmers of woodwinds mumbling out a dirge, some sort of siren being extensively permuted, etc. These fragments are obscured by the capricious distortions of Bowman's tape reels, whose screwy sense of time simulates the sound of a failing Walkman. Though he is operating in an improvisatory context, there is a consistency of spirit through this recording that was no doubt premeditated: a mucky gloom that overhangs the proceedings like a tent, submerging even the most extraneous noises in its burdened smear of unease. At its finest moments, the feeling is so dense it seems to thicken the very air in the room. (MT)
Address: http://mazurkaeditions.blogspot.com

MARTIN HANNETT - PLEASURES OF THE UNKNOWN (DVD/Book - sold separatly by OzIt Records)
You could wonder if this is the place to discuss this, but I think it very much is the right place. Not just because I happen to like the productions of Martin Hannett, but also because I think he's an innovator when it comes to studio trickery, not only incorporated with pop music. Listen to the long ending of Crispy Ambulance's 'Concorde Square' and you know what I mean. There was already a book on Martin Hannett, written by Colin Sharp, who was The Durutti Column's vocalist on 'A Factory Sample' (and dismissed as real Durutti Column by Vini Reilly later on). His book was part history and part fiction. As a fellow (hard-) drug user he was for a short while close friends with Martin and part of his tale was where he told the stories of that - and made up some stories along. His book wasn't a detailed story of Hannett's career, you didn't learn much, without getting too technical. This book and DVD perhaps fills up that gap. Both of these aren't conventional stories, but recollections of friends, musicians, label bosses and ex-wife's. Captured over a long period as on the DVD we see Tony Wilson in perfect health - and he died in 2007. Both more or less follow Hannett's life, childhood, his work for Music Force, and then as a producer for Buzzcocks, Jilted John, John Cooper Clarke, The Durutti Column, Joy Division, Happy Mondays and Stone Roses. Sometimes these recollections take a while and may not be very much to the point. The two guys that were Hannett's childhood friends surely have nice memories but are they really relevant for such a time frame on the DVD? Plus, and that's with more of these people, their northern accents aren't always easy to comprehend and the sound quality is overall 'mixed' to say the least. The few short instances with Bernard Sumner talking he can't barely be heard, but Peter Hook (usually following Sumner) is quite loud. A studio engineer who does an imitation of how Hannett recorded the drum sound takes an awfully lot of time to do his impressions - sometimes while talking with his back the camera. At four and half hours this is all lengthy stuff, and perhaps not well balanced. In the last hour things move to Joy Division/Happy Mondays/Stone Roses (why do people have to strum an acoustic guitar while being interviewed? Or wear sunglasses inside the house? Wear a scarf and a hat inside the house? Luckily the amount of musicians sitting in a posh studio declaring the 'sheer brilliance of this bass line, that drum pattern' is kept to a minimum). Obviously Hook/Sumner/Morris talked elsewhere about their time with Hannett - other books, other documentaries - but sadly Shaun Eyder didn't get permission from his manager to talk, and the Stone Roses did perhaps one failed album that was only a bootleg at one point. Most interesting, I thought was about his work with John Cooper Clarke (who himself is not interviewed) in which Hannett doubled as producer and bass player and The Durutti Column, plus that bit you can find on youtube in which Hannett explains the studio to a wider audience, and Tony Wilson. There is an experimental film bit with Hannett fiddling in the studio that is very nice. I assume this is from the 'Absolute Zero' video that once came with a Durutti Column re-issue. Here we hear Hannett working almost like a 'modern electronics' composer - and you wonder: why was there never a CD with more of this (assuming there is more)? It's not great the work of a genius, but surely nice. That alone is worth watching this. It would have been nice if someone would show us the AMS delay on a drum track to give us insight as what it did exactly.
The book more or less follows the same pattern and in some cases follow literally the interviews on the DVD - I watched and read both over Easter simultaneously - and here too there is a longitude in some chapters - childhood days, his work for Music Force - and less on what would be more interesting, which is his production work obviously, and I missed some of the other Factory bands, mostly Crispy Ambulance, whose slightly more prog sounding music was the perfect working material for Hannett, or the inevitable Martin Moscrop of A Certain Ratio - 'Flight' being a top three Hannett production as far as I'm concerned. Why not someone from Basement 5, a much-overlooked production, I think, in the Hannett canon? Sometimes a long list of equipment of a studio is provided, which is no doubt of interest to gear heads, of which I am not one. In the book everything is cleverly divided with people talking and hardly any narrative in between. That's a choice to present - the direct voice of those who (could) know - but it doesn't make this the definitive book on Hannett yet. Both DVD and book are source material, selective at that in who had what to say, but shedding some more light on what I think was indeed a genius. I think we would have to wait some more for a more definite book on Martin Hannett detailing each production and talk with everyone who was ever involved. (FdW)
Address: http://www.tractor-ozit.com/











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